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Giving and Receiving

I found the followinfor it is in Giving that we Receive!g  story “The Rich Family In Church” online, and as I was reading, it reminded me of our first year in Canada.
Most farming immigrants to Canada usually came to Canada to continue farming, so they sold their existing farm, bought a new farm here in North America – usually because there was a better future for the next generation of farmers.
We moved here from Germany, where my father leased a farm for almost 13 years. He did not have a farm to sell, so we came with little money here to Canada. The first year was very difficult, not only because we had to learn a new language, make new friends, etc., but because there were so many expenses that first year – money was very tight.
I remember our first Christmas – there was no money for anything, but we really did not mind. One afternoon one of the deacons of our church showed up on our doorstep and dropped off a box full of goodies, including a large turkey. The deacon must have felt bad – because he never said anything about it, he just left it there.
I remember the reaction of my mother; instead of being thankful for what she had received, she was almost upset and angry.
Her pride was hurt, to think that people thought of us as a poor family that needed a “handout”.
I could not understand her feelings at the time – but we certainly enjoyed that turkey.

The Rich Family In Church

by Eddie Ogan

I’ll never forget Easter 1946. I was 14, my little sister Ocy was 12, and my older sister Darlene 16. We lived at home with our mother, and the four of us knew what it was to do without many things. My dad had died five years before, leaving Mom with seven school kids to raise and no money.

By 1946 my older sisters were married and my brothers had left home. A month before Easter the pastor of our church announced that a special Easter offering would be taken to help a poor family. He asked everyone to save and give sacrificially.

When we got home, we talked about what we could do. We decided to buy 50 pounds of potatoes and live on them for a month. This would allow us to save $20 of our grocery money for the offering. When we thought that if we kept our electric lights turned out as much as possible and didn’t listen to the radio, we’d save money on that month’s electric bill. Darlene got as many house and yard cleaning jobs as possible, and both of us babysat for everyone we could. For 15 cents we could buy enough cotton loops to make three pot holders to sell for $1.

We made $20 on pot holders. That month was one of the best of our lives.

Every day we counted the money to see how much we had saved. At night we’d sit in the dark and talk about how the poor family was going to enjoy having the money the church would give them. We had about 80 people in church, so figured that whatever amount of money we had to give, the offering would surely be 20 times that much. After all, every Sunday the pastor had reminded everyone to save for the sacrificial offering.

The day before Easter, Ocy and I walked to the grocery store and got the manager to give us three crisp $20 bills and one $10 bill for all our change.

We ran all the way home to show Mom and Darlene. We had never had so much money before.

That night we were so excited we could hardly sleep. We didn’t care that we wouldn’t have new clothes for Easter; we had $70 for the sacrificial offering.

We could hardly wait to get to church! On Sunday morning, rain was pouring. We didn’t own an umbrella, and the church was over a mile from our home, but it didn’t seem to matter how wet we got. Darlene had cardboard in her shoes to fill the holes. The cardboard came apart, and her feet got wet.

But we sat in church proudly. I heard some teenagers talking about the Smith girls having on their old dresses. I looked at them in their new clothes, and I felt rich.

When the sacrificial offering was taken, we were sitting on the second row from the front. Mom put in the $10 bill, and each of us kids put in a $20.

As we walked home after church, we sang all the way. At lunch Mom had a surprise for us. She had bought a dozen eggs, and we had boiled Easter eggs with our fried potatoes! Late that afternoon the minister drove up in his car. Mom went to the door, talked with him for a moment, and then came back with an envelope in her hand. We asked what it was, but she didn’t say a word. She opened the envelope and out fell a bunch of money. There were three crisp $20 bills, one $10 and seventeen $1 bills.

Mom put the money back in the envelope. We didn’t talk, just sat and stared at the floor. We had gone from feeling like millionaires to feeling like poor white trash. We kids had such a happy life that we felt sorry for anyone who didn’t have our Mom and Dad for parents and a house full of brothers and sisters and other kids visiting constantly. We thought it was fun to share silverware and see whether we got the spoon or the fork that night.

We had two knifes that we passed around to whoever needed them. I knew we didn’t have a lot of things that other people had, but I’d never thought we were poor.

That Easter day I found out we were. The minister had brought us the money for the poor family, so we must be poor. I didn’t like being poor. I looked at my dress and worn-out shoes and felt so ashamed—I didn’t even want to go back to church. Everyone there probably already knew we were poor!

I thought about school. I was in the ninth grade and at the top of my class of over 100 students. I wondered if the kids at school knew that we were poor. I decided that I could quit school since I had finished the eighth grade. That was all the law required at that time. We sat in silence for a long time. Then it got dark, and we went to bed. All that week, we girls went to school and came home, and no one talked much. Finally on Saturday, Mom asked us what we wanted to do with the money. What did poor people do with money? We didn’t know. We’d never known we were poor. We didn’t want to go to church on Sunday, but Mom said we had to. Although it was a sunny day, we didn’t talk on the way.

Mom started to sing, but no one joined in and she only sang one verse. At church we had a missionary speaker. He talked about how churches in Africa made buildings out of sun dried bricks, but they needed money to buy roofs. He said $100 would put a roof on a church. The minister said, “Can’t we all sacrifice to help these poor people?” We looked at each other and smiled for the first time in a week.

Mom reached into her purse and pulled out the envelope. She passed it to Darlene. Darlene gave it to me, and I handed it to Ocy. Ocy put it in the offering.

When the offering was counted, the minister announced that it was a little over $100. The missionary was excited. He hadn’t expected such a large offering from our small church. He said, “You must have some rich people in this church.”

Suddenly it struck us! We had given $87 of that “little over $100.”

We were the rich family in the church! Hadn’t the missionary said so? From that day on I’ve never been poor again. I’ve always remembered how rich I am because I have Jesus!

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Acts 20:35 ESV

In all things I have shown you that by working hard in this way we must help the weak and remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he himself said, ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive.’”

Proverbs 11:24-25 ESV

One gives freely, yet grows all the richer; another withholds what he should give, and only suffers want. Whoever brings blessing will be enriched, and one who waters will himself be watered.

2 Corinthians 9:7 ESV

Each one must give as he has decided in his heart, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.

For the Record Collection – Our Family

For the Record Collection – Our Family part of the “For the Record Collection” by Paper Loft.
I used 2 sheets of paper to create this 2 page layout.
This pedigree chart gave me room to include 3 generations – you, parents and grandparents.
There are also spaces to fill in the names of your children, as well as your siblings.
There is lots of room to add photos and other memorabilia.
Buy two sheets, and place them side-by-side so they flow on rather than having to flip over – it makes it easier to read as well, and can be used side-by-side in a 12×24 flip-out page which is available.

Copy of Family Record - Our Family 1Family Record - Our Family 2

Purchase For the Record – Our Family Genealogy Scrapbook Paper > >

One Mystery Solved

I love going to estate sales and auctions, as well as antique stores. Often I come across a boxes of old photographs – pictures of families, of children, of someone’s ancestors – someone’s link to the past.
This really saddens me, no one has claimed these pictures, no one knows who they are.
I too have a box of pictures in my possession – I know they belong to our family, but I don’t know who they are. These are just a few “Unknowns” in my collection.

Unknown couple 2Unknown FamilyUnknown Couple
Unknown Soldier 3Unknown SoldierUnknownUnknown BoysUnknown children 200x311Recently I was doing some online research on my husband’s side of our family tree, and came upon this site: Het nageslacht van IJtzen Lieuwes Tamminga en Hiltje Karsjens Kalma As I was looking around on this great site, I ended up on this page page and found a very familiar picture, a picture in my “unknown” collection.
I now know that the lady in the picture was Antje Tjitzes Miedema, a sister of my husband’s grandfather – Klaas Tjitzes Miedema.
This site also provided me with more pictures of his grandmother’s family.
So thank you.
This leaves me one less mystery to solve.

Gerrit Lieuwes Tamminga and Antje Tjitzes Miedema

Gerrit Lieuwes Tamminga and Antje Tjitzes Miedema

STRANGERS IN THE BOX 
-Pamela A. Harazim

“Come, look with me inside this drawer, 
In this box I’ve often seen, 
At the pictures, black and white, 
Faces proud, still, and serene.
 
I wish I knew the people, 
These strangers in the box, 
Their names and all their memories, 
Are lost among my socks.
 
I wonder what their lives were like, 
How did they spend their days? 
What about their special times? 
I’ll never know their ways.
 
If only someone had taken time, 
To tell, who, what, where, and when, 
These faces of my heritage, 
Would come to life again.
 
Could this become the fate, 
Of the pictures we take today? 
The faces and the memories, 
Someday to be passed away?
 
Take time to save your stories, 
Seize the opportunity when it knocks, 
Or someday you and yours, 
Could be strangers in the box.”
~